Tagged: Monuments

This Week

A weekly round-up of my favorite preservation related stories from around the web and in the newsClick on the title of each story to jump through to the original article/blog post.

Scaffolding is All Over, Here’s Why The Monuments Still Look Majestic – Smithsonian Magazine

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Scaffolding designed by Michael Graves & Associates circa 2000. Interested in the specifications for the dramatic structure currently enshrouding the Monument? Check this excellent graphic from the Washington Post. Image via Smithsonian Magazine

There’s been so much scaffolding recently in Washington D.C. that it looks like the capital is recovering from an incredibly ruthless alien invasion, a knock-down drag-out superhero brawl, or some other action film-level disaster. In a city as widely visited as Washington D.C., a city where it seems that even structures of the smallest import are national landmarks, it’s not exactly desirable to have the monuments, memorials and buildings concealed behind wood and metal cages.  As a result, D.C. architects have gotten creative.  They are using enormous scrims printed with the image of the building/monument (a practice long used in Europe). And they are using beautifully designed illuminated scaffolding, like that on the Washington Monument.

Fort Lyon Treatment Facility in Colorado– Here and Now

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Fort Lyon was once on Preservation Colorado’s most endangered list. Image via Preservation Colorado

Fort Lyon, a former Army fort and sanitarium that opened after the Civil War feels like an Ivy League college campus – some people call it the Princeton of the Plains. It was a minimum security prison until two years ago when the state shut it down because of the budget shortfall.  Now it has a new life as an experimental drug treatment facility. When the prison closed, it was a huge blow to the region’s economy. State leaders eventually directed more than $10 million to reopen the facility for its new use. Preservation can happen in the most unexpected of ways.

The Awesomely Insane Heaven and Hell Nightclubs of 1890s Paris –  io9

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Le Ciel et l’Enfer was only one of your options if you wanted a morbid night club experience in 1890s Paris. Image via i09

Turn of the century Paris was choc-a-block with macabre night clubs where one could ponder mortality and be heckled by Satan while sipping on cocktails named after pestilence and disease.  Not my cup of tea, I’d probably rather have my libations free of plague and Satan, but these photos are pretty amazing!

Why Do Old Places Matter? – National Trust of Historic Preservation

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The stone walls and moat of Fort Monroe. Image via NTHP

“This series of essays will explore  the reasons that old places are good for people. It begins with what I consider the main reason—that old places are important for people to define who they are through memory, continuity, and identity—that “sense of orientation” referred to in With Heritage So Rich.These fundamental reasons inform all of the other reasons that follow: commemoration, beauty, civic identity, and the reasons that are more pragmatic—preservation as a tool for community revitalization, the stabilization of property values, economic development, and sustainability.”

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This Week

A weekly round-up of my favorite preservation related stories from around the web and in the news. Click on the title of each story to jump through to the original article/blog post.

The Global Gateways that Connect America to the World

Image via Arno Neumann.

“John Kasadra and Greg Lindsay [in The Atlantic Cities] argue that airports underpin a whole new aerotropolis model for economic development that is reshaping economic growth and development in ways that are similar to what the automobile did in the last century, and railroads and waterways did before that.”  The automobile, railroads, and waterways all had a huge impact on the landscape. Waterways moved people into previously unsettled territories, towns and cities sprung up around railroad stops, and the automobile encouraged suburbanization and roadside culture.  How might aerotropolises reshape how we build and how we live?

Scotland’s Community Heritage

“Community archaeology and heritage projects in Scotland have grown remarkably in numbers in recent years.  This growth can in part be attributed to the results of the RCAHMS run project, Scotland’s Rural Past, Shorewatch by The Scape Trust, and the work of Archaeology Scotland, such as Adopt-a-Monument, together which have helped increase the capacity for community led archaeology and heritage projects.”

South Africa’s Robben Island Museum

Robben Island Museum. Image via Exhibition List

Nelson Mandela and other political prisoners of the Apartheid era in South Africa were held on Robben Island. Tours allow visitors to see Mandela’s room and garden, and the quarry in which he and his fellow prisoners worked.  The museum tour is presented in two parts. First, a docent provides an overview of the prison, then a former political prisoner provides a guided walking tour through the prison sharing his personal experience.

Love to Long Island

In the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy, Preservation in Pink posted a touching love letter to Long Island.  “Historic or not, we can all appreciate that every place matters to someone. Historic preservation isn’t only about historically significant buildings; it is about your community and having pride where you live and being a part of the greater story. Stay strong everyone and lend a hand to those in need.”

Abandoned Monuments from the Recent Past

Tjentiste. Image via feeldesain.

“These structures were commissioned by former Yugoslavian president Josip Broz Tito in the 1960s and 70s to commemorate sites where WWII battles took place (like Tjentište, Kozara and Kadinjača), or where concentration camps stood (like Jasenovac and Niš). They were designed by different sculptors  and architects, conveying powerful visual impact to show the confidence and strength of the Socialist Republic. In the 1980s, these monuments attracted millions of visitors per year, especially young pioneers for their ‘patriotic education.’ After the Republic dissolved in early 1990s, they were completely abandoned, and their symbolic meanings were forever lost.”  Jump through to see more of these impressive brutalist monuments.